nprglobalhealth
nprglobalhealth:

Rice Bucket Challenge: Put Rice In Bucket, Do Not Pour Over Head
There’s the Ice Bucket Challenge. And now there’s the Rice Bucket Challenge.
More than a million people worldwide have poured buckets of ice water over their heads as part of a fund-raising campaign for ALS, or Lou Gehrig’s disease.
But when word of the challenge made its way to India, where more than 100 million people lack access to clean drinking water, locals weren’t exactly eager to drench themselves with the scarce supply.
And so, a spinoff was born.
Manju Kalanidhi, a 38-year-old journalist from Hyderabad who reports on the global rice market, put her own twist on the challenge. She calls her version the Rice Bucket Challenge, but don’t worry, no grains of rice went to waste.
Instead, they went to the hungry.
"I personally think the [Ice Bucket Challenge] is ideal for the American demographic," she says. "But in India, we have loads of other causes to promote."
Kalanidhi came up with a desi version — that’s a Hindi word to describe something Indian. She chose to focus on hunger. A third of India’s 1.2 billion people live on less than $1.25 USD a day, and a kilogram of rice, or 2 pounds, costs between 80 cents and a dollar. A family of four would go through roughly 45 pounds of rice a month, she says.
That’s why she’s challenging people to give a bucket of rice, cooked or uncooked, to a person in need. Snap a photo, share it online and, just as with the Ice Bucket Challenge, nominate friends to take part, she suggests. For those who want to help more than one person at a time, she recommends donating to a food charity.
Continue reading.
Photo: Rice is just as nice as ice when it comes to bucket challenges. Right: Manju Latha Kalanidhi, creator of the Rice Bucket Challenge, gives grains to a hard-working neighbor. (Courtesy of Manju Latha Kalanidhi)

nprglobalhealth:

Rice Bucket Challenge: Put Rice In Bucket, Do Not Pour Over Head

There’s the Ice Bucket Challenge. And now there’s the Rice Bucket Challenge.

More than a million people worldwide have poured buckets of ice water over their heads as part of a fund-raising campaign for ALS, or Lou Gehrig’s disease.

But when word of the challenge made its way to India, where more than 100 million people lack access to clean drinking water, locals weren’t exactly eager to drench themselves with the scarce supply.

And so, a spinoff was born.

Manju Kalanidhi, a 38-year-old journalist from Hyderabad who reports on the global rice market, put her own twist on the challenge. She calls her version the Rice Bucket Challenge, but don’t worry, no grains of rice went to waste.

Instead, they went to the hungry.

"I personally think the [Ice Bucket Challenge] is ideal for the American demographic," she says. "But in India, we have loads of other causes to promote."

Kalanidhi came up with a desi version — that’s a Hindi word to describe something Indian. She chose to focus on hunger. A third of India’s 1.2 billion people live on less than $1.25 USD a day, and a kilogram of rice, or 2 pounds, costs between 80 cents and a dollar. A family of four would go through roughly 45 pounds of rice a month, she says.

That’s why she’s challenging people to give a bucket of rice, cooked or uncooked, to a person in need. Snap a photo, share it online and, just as with the Ice Bucket Challenge, nominate friends to take part, she suggests. For those who want to help more than one person at a time, she recommends donating to a food charity.

Continue reading.

Photo: Rice is just as nice as ice when it comes to bucket challenges. Right: Manju Latha Kalanidhi, creator of the Rice Bucket Challenge, gives grains to a hard-working neighbor. (Courtesy of Manju Latha Kalanidhi)

neurosciencestuff
neurosciencestuff:

Scientists Link Alcohol-Dependence Gene to Neurotransmitter
Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have solved the mystery of why a specific signaling pathway can be associated with alcohol dependence. 
This signaling pathway is regulated by a gene, called neurofibromatosis type 1 (Nf1), which TSRI scientists found is linked with excessive drinking in mice. The new research shows Nf1 regulates gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), a neurotransmitter that lowers anxiety and increases feelings of relaxation.
“This novel and seminal study provides insights into the cellular mechanisms of alcohol dependence,” said TSRI Associate Professor Marisa Roberto, a co-author of the paper. “Importantly, the study also offers a correlation between rodent and human data.”
In addition to showing that Nf1 is key to the regulation of the GABA, the research, which was published recently in the journal Biological Psychiatry, shows that variations in the human version of the Nf1 gene are linked to alcohol-dependence risk and severity in patients.
Pietro Paolo Sanna, associate professor at TSRI and the study’s corresponding author, was optimistic about the long-term clinical implications of the work. “A better understanding of the molecular processes involved in the transition to alcohol dependence will foster novel strategies for prevention and therapy,” he said.
A Genetic Culprit
Researchers have long sought a gene or genes that might be responsible for risk and severity of alcohol dependence. “Despite a significant genetic contribution to alcohol dependence, few risk genes have been identified to date, and their mechanisms of action are generally poorly understood,” said TSRI Staff Scientist Vez Repunte-Canonigo, co-first author of the paper with TSRI Research Associate Melissa Herman.
This research showed that Nf1 is one of those rare risk genes, but the TSRI researchers weren’t sure exactly how Nf1 affected the brain. The TSRI research team suspected that Nf1 might be relevant to alcohol-related GABA activity in an area of the brain called the central amygdala, which is important in decision-making and stress- and addiction-related processes.
“As GABA release in the central amygdala has been shown to be critical in the transition from recreational drinking to alcohol dependence, we thought that Nf1 regulation of GABA release might be relevant to alcohol consumption,” said Herman.
The team tested several behavioral models, including a model in which mice escalate alcohol drinking after repeated withdrawal periods, to study the effects of partially deleting Nf1. In this experiment, which simulated the transition to excessive drinking that is associated with alcohol dependence in humans, they found that mice with functional Nf1 genes steadily increased their ethanol intake starting after just one episode of withdrawal. Conversely, mice with a partially deleted Nf1 gene showed no increase in alcohol consumption.
Investigating further, the researchers found that in mice with partially deleted Nf1 genes, alcohol consumption did not further increase GABA release in the central amygdala. In contrast, in mice with functional Nf1 genes, alcohol consumption resulted in an increase in central amygdala GABA.
In the second part of the study, a collaboration with a distinguished group of geneticists at various U.S. institutions, the team analyzed data on human variations of the Nf1 gene from about 9,000 people. The results showed an association between the gene and alcohol-dependence risk and severity.
The team sees the new findings as “pieces to the puzzle.” Sanna believes future research should focus on exactly how Nf1 regulates the GABA system and how gene expression may be altered during early development.

neurosciencestuff:

Scientists Link Alcohol-Dependence Gene to Neurotransmitter

Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have solved the mystery of why a specific signaling pathway can be associated with alcohol dependence.

This signaling pathway is regulated by a gene, called neurofibromatosis type 1 (Nf1), which TSRI scientists found is linked with excessive drinking in mice. The new research shows Nf1 regulates gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), a neurotransmitter that lowers anxiety and increases feelings of relaxation.

“This novel and seminal study provides insights into the cellular mechanisms of alcohol dependence,” said TSRI Associate Professor Marisa Roberto, a co-author of the paper. “Importantly, the study also offers a correlation between rodent and human data.”

In addition to showing that Nf1 is key to the regulation of the GABA, the research, which was published recently in the journal Biological Psychiatry, shows that variations in the human version of the Nf1 gene are linked to alcohol-dependence risk and severity in patients.

Pietro Paolo Sanna, associate professor at TSRI and the study’s corresponding author, was optimistic about the long-term clinical implications of the work. “A better understanding of the molecular processes involved in the transition to alcohol dependence will foster novel strategies for prevention and therapy,” he said.

A Genetic Culprit

Researchers have long sought a gene or genes that might be responsible for risk and severity of alcohol dependence. “Despite a significant genetic contribution to alcohol dependence, few risk genes have been identified to date, and their mechanisms of action are generally poorly understood,” said TSRI Staff Scientist Vez Repunte-Canonigo, co-first author of the paper with TSRI Research Associate Melissa Herman.

This research showed that Nf1 is one of those rare risk genes, but the TSRI researchers weren’t sure exactly how Nf1 affected the brain. The TSRI research team suspected that Nf1 might be relevant to alcohol-related GABA activity in an area of the brain called the central amygdala, which is important in decision-making and stress- and addiction-related processes.

“As GABA release in the central amygdala has been shown to be critical in the transition from recreational drinking to alcohol dependence, we thought that Nf1 regulation of GABA release might be relevant to alcohol consumption,” said Herman.

The team tested several behavioral models, including a model in which mice escalate alcohol drinking after repeated withdrawal periods, to study the effects of partially deleting Nf1. In this experiment, which simulated the transition to excessive drinking that is associated with alcohol dependence in humans, they found that mice with functional Nf1 genes steadily increased their ethanol intake starting after just one episode of withdrawal. Conversely, mice with a partially deleted Nf1 gene showed no increase in alcohol consumption.

Investigating further, the researchers found that in mice with partially deleted Nf1 genes, alcohol consumption did not further increase GABA release in the central amygdala. In contrast, in mice with functional Nf1 genes, alcohol consumption resulted in an increase in central amygdala GABA.

In the second part of the study, a collaboration with a distinguished group of geneticists at various U.S. institutions, the team analyzed data on human variations of the Nf1 gene from about 9,000 people. The results showed an association between the gene and alcohol-dependence risk and severity.

The team sees the new findings as “pieces to the puzzle.” Sanna believes future research should focus on exactly how Nf1 regulates the GABA system and how gene expression may be altered during early development.

kqedscience
kqedscience:

Scientists reveal how they feel about climate change in handwritten letters and photos
“Scientists can be a practical bunch, they deal with facts, data, hard evidence. But even scientists can lose their s*** sometimes and now they are revealing how they really feel.
Academics from around Australia have posed for striking photographs, while others have put their feelings about climate change in handwritten letters as part of two independent projects.
In one masters project, Australian National University student Joe Duggan contacted scientists and asked them to write the letters about how they felt about climate change.
“What follows are the words of real scientists. Researchers that understand climate change,” states the Is This How You Feel website, where Duggan is publishing the letters.”
Read more from news.com.au.

kqedscience:

Scientists reveal how they feel about climate change in handwritten letters and photos

Scientists can be a practical bunch, they deal with facts, data, hard evidence. But even scientists can lose their s*** sometimes and now they are revealing how they really feel.

Academics from around Australia have posed for striking photographs, while others have put their feelings about climate change in handwritten letters as part of two independent projects.

In one masters project, Australian National University student Joe Duggan contacted scientists and asked them to write the letters about how they felt about climate change.

“What follows are the words of real scientists. Researchers that understand climate change,” states the Is This How You Feel website, where Duggan is publishing the letters.”

Read more from news.com.au.

kellysue

twofistedpulp:

As Earle Bergey is to Barbarella, Allan Anderson is to Xena Warrior-Princess.

While Bergey’s cover girls were all cutesy miniskirts & ray guns, Anderson’s were chain-mail & badass battle-axes. And none more so than his Black Amazon of Mars.

Planet Stories, March 1951.

And Leigh Brackett, Leigh. Eff-ing. Brackett. Known as the “Queen of Space Opera”, one of the best and most prolific of all the women pulp writers, she wrote dozens of short stories & novelettes for Planet Stories, Startling Stories and Thrilling Wonder Stories throughout the forties & fifties before starting a jaw dropping screenwriting career.

Her first hollywood gig? Co-writing the adaptation of The Big Sleep…with William Faulkner. She then wrote a series of westerns for John Wayne before returning to the works of Raymond Chandler with Robert Altman’s The Long Goodbye.

Her Final hollywood work? A little flick called Episode V: The Empire Strikes Back.

The Queen of Space Opera? All hail the Queen.

#mypulpfinds

smartgirlsattheparty

angelclark:

33 Pictures Taken At The Right Moment 

We are huge fans of perfectly timed photos that capture perfect (and usually funny or unexpected) moments that come and go with a blink of the eye. The internet is abound with images shared by people who have captured images at just the right moment or from just the right perspective, so we wanted to share some more of them with you.